Thursday, December 30, 2010

Once Upon a Miracle by Wanda Baylis (Dream4More Review)

Once Upon A MiracleOnce Upon A Miracle by Wanda Baylis

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Wanda shares a gratifying and unbelievable autobiographical story of how she conceived a child outside of her womb at age of 29. We also read from the doctor and nurse in the foreword and prelude of the opening of the book, then her introduction of how she dreamed of having a child of her own after being in the hospital room with her goddaughter giving birth to her own child. The author went at all lengths to conceive the miracle baby before turning 30, based on her medical condition and following the hormonal requirements such as certain hours of the day and sexual positions during ovulation, and willing to have a child with a man who was already joined to another woman. She was willing to make these sacrifices to have a child, as the "other woman", and to take care of the infant solo if she had to. God made all things possible even in the mess of things.

There are some passages that could have been condensed or her early life experiences to less than a chapter and focused on the premises of the miracle baby as the book is entitled. We do want to know how the child was conceived (Clifton), the pregnancy and medical mishaps, etc, and the aftermath of which she indulged her readers with rightfully so. It is well-appreciated to know such a story and shared with everyone to show God's goodness regardless of the outcome.

The book is 348 pages, and could see this book at barely 200 pages to enlighten the reader with the "meat of the story" instead. I welcome the "life lessons" she also shared in the book even though she admits she didn't take it, especially messing with a man whom she knew had another roommate (woman) and conceiving a child with anyhow to bring life into this world. Barren to birth is a remarkable story to be known even today, and highly to those who have medical conditions that leave women barren in which this story gives them hope.

Overall, her "miracle" baby and "miracle experience" shows us that unsung heroes of ordinary people with extraordinary stories should be shared. Her daughter survived on earth for 7 1/2 weeks, "seven" means completion, and lived to show God's miraculous powers and joined her Heavenly Daddy. We don't need celebrities necessarily to tell their memorable stories (memoir) to have such an impact on one's life like this book.

In the back of the book, she included those who endorsed the book, actual medical records, and photos throughout the book of family, her, and the baby when born, etc.

*There were editors mentioned in the acknowledgment page, yet still were minor grammatical and/or typographical errors throughout the book (e.g. on lookers should be onlookers, goodbye was written in the book as good bye or good-bye (which is acceptable), US should be U.S. and word confusion 'since' should be 'sense'). However, this doesn't take anything from admiring the story told, miracle shared, and beneficial to those who have lost hope on God's miracles.

I would recommend this to women with medical conditions that doctors do not see them having children or barren to at least see how God's miracle worked in another woman's life regardless of what the doctors said. Single women who want children, those 25 and up, and medical professionals to see how the miracles manifested vs. medical science.

Dream 4 More Reviews received a copy of the book from the author's marketing representative.

Dream 4 More Reviewer,

Adrienna Turner

Sweet Dreams!

View all my reviews

No comments:

Post a Comment


Adrienna Turner's Contributor Profile - Associated Content